2018 Nissan GT-R Review

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The 2018 Nissan GT-R's age belies its performance. The onetime technological wunderkind is still a brutish handful of a car, and unapologetic about it, too.

This is the time to be alive if you're shopping for a high-performance sports car. Not only are there more choices than ever, sports car manufacturers have a seemingly unending supply of updates to apply to their technological powerhouses. But for the 2018 GT-R, Nissan is doing things a little differently. While most manufacturers are selling cars with more features and corresponding price hikes, Nissan is bringing out a less expensive GT-R trim, called Pure, to the lineup. The benefit to consumers? The Pure's starting MSRP is below the six-figure mark.

Whichever trim you get, the GT-R brings plenty of performance to the road with little sacrifice in regard to comfort and convenience. To its credit, Nissan has continuously updated and refined the the GT-R's powertrain, and it's much more refined than when it was introduced back in 2009. But compared to other performance cars with dual-clutch transmissions on the market, the GT-R is still lurchy and noisy. For better and for worse, the 2018 GT-R is fundamentally the same well-appointed but rough-and-tumble car as the one from nine years ago.

The 2018 Nissan GT-R is a high-performance sport coupe. It uses a turbocharged 3.8-liter V6 engine (565 hp, 467 pound-feet of torque), a six-speed, dual-clutch automatic transmission and a variable all-wheel-drive system for its propulsion. Pure, the new trim level, is the least expensive way to get a GT-R, but it still has all the essential features. Premium trim cars add luxury options, while the Track Edition adds even more track focus. Finally, the GT-R Nismo ups all performance qualities to the max, including an engine tuned for more power.

The new Pure trim includes 20-inch wheels with summer run-flat tires, LED headlights and running lights, power-folding and heated mirrors, front and rear parking sensors, an adaptive suspension, configurable drive modes, and keyless entry and ignition.

Inside, you get leather upholstery with faux suede inserts, dual-zone automatic climate control, a heated eight-way power driver seat (four-way for the front passenger), a manual tilt-and-telescoping steering wheel, a rearview camera, an 8-inch touchscreen, a navigation system, voice controls, NissanConnect mobile-app integration, Apple CarPlay, Bluetooth, and a six-speaker Bose audio system with active noise cancellation and enhancement, USB connectivity, and satellite and HD radio.

Going with the Premium adds an active sound enhancement and noise cancellation system, titanium exhaust, and a 11-speaker sound system.

Options for the Pure and Premium are limited to the Cold Weather package, with all-season tires and a unique coolant mixture. Premium models can be equipped with a Premium Interior package, which adds hand-stitched premium leather upholstery; special floor mats; and a few premium paint and interior color schemes.

The GT-R Track Edition is similar but receives the Nismo's suspension, chassis and interior upgrades (see below).

Finally, the limited-production GT-R Nismo comes with a stiffer body structure, a front fascia with more cooling area and downforce, side skirts and rear wing, Recaro seats, lightweight forged alloy wheels, a more aggressive suspension calibration, and an uprated version of the V6 engine good for 600 hp and 481 lb-ft of torque.

From Edmunds.com

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