2016 Honda Accord Review

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Following a significant update last year, the 2017 Honda Accord sedan and coupe are largely unchanged aside from a new Sport Special Edition trim level. The 2017 Accord Sport SE includes heated leather seats but is otherwise just like the regular Sport. If you're shopping for a midsize family sedan, the 2017 Honda Accord is a must-drive and always a top contender among its rivals.

Following some notable revisions last year, the 2017 Honda Accord is essentially a carryover model, and an aging one at that. Even so, most of the midsize-sedan segment is still playing catchup. The current Accord is arguably Honda at its finest. It scores highly in just about every category, and unlike many rivals, it's a genuine pleasure to drive. If you're looking for a family sedan that does it all, the 2017 Accord's across-the-board excellence simply cannot be ignored.

Of course, there's always room for improvement, and that's most apparent in the Accord's so-so touchscreen interface (standard from the EX on up), which isn't as user-friendly as one might expect from the brand. The Honda Sensing safety suite is also an acquired taste, especially its alarmist collision warning system. But Honda Sensing is optional on all but the top-level Touring trim, so you're generally not stuck with it, and a mediocre touchscreen is perhaps a small price to pay for the Accord's outstanding driving dynamics and spacious interior, among other strengths. Resale value is top of class, too, which makes the Accord extra appealing if you're planning to buy one and hang onto it for a while.

The Accord is also sold as a coupe, and it's the only midsize, front-wheel-drive coupe in this price range, though you might consider the Ford Mustang and Chevrolet Camaro as sportier, less-practical alternatives. It's a different story with the Accord sedan, as the midsize segment is one of the most hotly contested you'll find. Standout rivals include the sporty and high-tech Ford Fusion, the value-packed Hyundai Sonata and the roomy and refined Volkswagen Passat, while the freshly redesigned Chevrolet Malibu also merits consideration. But the 2017 Honda Accord continues to be one of the very best cars of its kind.

The 2017 Honda Accord is available as a midsize sedan and coupe. Four-cylinder sedans come in five trim levels: LX, Sport, Sport Special Edition (or "Sport SE"), EX and EX-L. Opt for the Accord's 3.5-liter V6 and two trims are offered: EX-L and Touring.

The Accord coupe with the four-cylinder engine comes in LX-S, EX and EX-L, while the V6-equipped version comes only in EX-L and Touring trims.

Starting with the sedans, the base four-cylinder LX is quite generously equipped, including 16-inch alloy wheels, automatic headlights, LED taillights, dual-zone automatic climate control, cruise control, a 7.7-inch central infotainment display (not to be confused with the touchscreen that's added on higher trims), Bluetooth, a rearview camera, a height-adjustable driver seat, a one-piece folding rear seat and a four-speaker sound system with a CD player, an auxiliary audio jack, a USB port and Pandora integration.

Opting for the Sport brings a bit more horsepower, 19-inch wheels, a rear trunk lid spoiler, dual exhaust tips, LED daytime running lights and foglights, cloth seating with leatherette bolsters, an eight-way power driver seat (with two-way power lumbar), a 60/40 split-folding rear seat and a leather-wrapped steering wheel (with shift paddles if the automatic transmission is specified).

The Sport Special Edition is very similar to the regular Sport, but it adds special-edition badging, heated front seats and leather seats with red accent stitching.

The Accord EX also builds off the LX, but it focuses more on extra amenities than sportiness, adding 17-inch wheels, LED daytime running lights and foglights, heated mirrors, a sunroof, keyless ignition and entry, remote ignition (with the automatic transmission), the eight-way power driver seat (with two-way power lumbar), Honda LaneWatch blind-spot display, a six-speaker sound system with a 7-inch touchscreen interface (the standard 7.7-inch display remains as well), satellite and HD radio and a second USB port. Also standard is smartphone app integration via HondaLink (with smartphone-enabled Aha radio features), Android Auto and Apple CarPlay.

The EX-L trim adds leather upholstery, driver-seat memory functions, a four-way power passenger seat, heated front seats, an auto-dimming rearview mirror and an upgraded seven-speaker sound system.

As the name suggests, the EX-L V6 adds a six-cylinder engine, as well as dual exhaust tips.

All of the above trims can be outfitted with the Honda Sensing package, which includes adaptive cruise control and additional safety features (see Safety section). A navigation system is optional for the EX-L and EX-L V6.

The range-topping Touring takes the EX-L V6 offerings and adds the features from the Honda Sensing package as well as 19-inch wheels, LED headlights (with automatic high beam control), automatic wipers, front and rear parking sensors, a rear deck lid spoiler, heated outboard rear seats and the navigation system.

For the Accord coupe, the base LX-S trim is similar to the LX sedan but adds 17-inch wheels and the six-speaker audio system. The coupe's EX, EX-L, EX-L V6 and Touring trims are also comparable to the sedan's in terms of equipment, though every EX variant gets 18-inch wheels (the Touring gets 19s). Note that all automatic-transmission coupes include standard paddle shifters.

From Edmunds.com

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